Photo de la Semaine: Week 6

Photo of the Week
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The dress of my darling friend/teacher Simone

Asalaa Maalekum, everyone! Did you know? Senegal is famous for it’s abundance of African wax print fabric. It’s called ‘wax’ because of the waxy texture, which is more or less shiny/stiff depending on the quality. Wax fabric comes in any color/pattern combination you could possibly think of. Things I have seen printed on African wax fabric include spray paint (with hand attached), toothpaste, electric fans, bathtubs with showers attached, shrimp, lightbulbs, flashing camera (with hand attached), dismembered fingers, and dinner plates with whole fish. If you look in the ‘About Rheanna’ section of the blog, you can see me wearing a dress my host aunt made out of of wax I picked out at HLM, the biggest wax fabric market in West Africa! What kind of wax fabric would you want?

And now to get to all those awesome questions!

Emily: Yes I did like [the finger henna]. Thanks, Emily! So do I!

Rayne: In the city, do they have bathrooms for both genders or just one? Most of the bathrooms I see are single-stall bathrooms designated by ‘male’ or ‘female’, or else as gender neutral if there is only one.

Samantha: Do they have clothing stores like Ross? Not really, no! Some people get their clothes from used clothing markets where clothes are sold in little market stalls at low prices, but most people get their clothes hand-made by tailors out of wax fabric! I’ve had four dresses made while being here – none of them cost more than $14 each.

Grace: Do you see tumble weeds in the desert? No, Lompoul was not a desert with tumble weeds.

Connor: Was it difficult adapting to Africa? Well, that’s hard to say, as Africa is HUGE with many countries, many climates and many, many different cultures. I’m not sure if I would be able to easily adapt to any other African country besides Senegal. As for adapting to Senegal – many things were very hard. The first month I was here, I was constantly sick from the change in food. And even though I speak a pretty decent level of French, it was really hard to adjust to everyone mostly speaking Wolof all the time. There are dozens of cultural things that were difficult to adjust to completely, which I’d love to talk about sometime. Thanks for the question!

Jacky: Was that snapchat for the picture of the fingers? Ha! Yep, you got me. 🙂

Emma: That [slavery] is terrible. I completely agree, Emma.

Does slavery still happen in Senegal? Do the English come take people away? Legal slavery was abolished (ended) by France in 1794, as well as Senegal since it was under the rule of the French. However, legal slavery in Mauritania, the country just north of Senegal (which I posted about last week), was not abolished until 1981! That’s only 35 years ago. It is very probable that even though slavery was ended in Senegal, there were still people from Senegal enslaved in Mauritania. Unfortunately, although slavery is no longer legal anywhere in the world, illegal slavery still exists everywhere, including the United States. It is simply harder to see because of how hidden it is.

William: I never actually knew that slavery was going on in West Africa. Well, it technically isn’t anymore, at least not legally. Had you learned about the trans-atlantic slave trade and slavery in the U.S. in school before?

Reuben: I do not like slavery especially because I am Black. I saw the movie Django. Dang, I haven’t even seen Django yet! I hear you, Reuben. I don’t like it either. As a white person, it is hard for me to imagine what Black people must feel when reading about things like this.

Ayan: That’s sad. I agree, Ayan.

Thanks for all the great questions this week. I can’t wait to interview my sister with your great interview questions, as well!

Ba ayu bès bii di ñew, insh’allah! (See you next week, God willing!)

-Rheanna

 

 

 

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